1. ilovecharts:

Giving And Getting 

    ilovecharts:

    Giving And Getting 

  2. mentalflossr:

    The Best/Freakiest Dictionary Promotional Video From the 70s You’ve Ever Seen

    Holy mackerel, this is awesome.

  3. (Source: vintageanchorbooks)

  4. sagansense:


“What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny dark squiggles. But one glance at it and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs. Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.” Carl Sagan 
Related: Carl Sagan on how many books we can read and describing what a book is.

    sagansense:

    “What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny dark squiggles. But one glance at it and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs. Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.”
    Carl Sagan

    Related: Carl Sagan on how many books we can read and describing what a book is.

  5. fishingboatproceeds:

    latimes:

    Pete Seeger has passed away in New York. He was 94.

    "At some point, Pete Seeger decided he’d be a walking, singing reminder of all of America’s history," Bruce Springsteen said at a Madison Square Garden concert marking Seeger’s 90th birthday in 2009. "He’d be a living archive of America’s music and conscience, a testament to the power of song and culture to nudge history along, to push American events towards a more humane and justified ends."

    Here’s Seeger performing “Michael, Row the Boat Ashore.”

    Seeger famously responded to Woody Guthrie’s “This Machine Kills Fascists” guitar with a banjo that read, “This machine surrounds hate and forces it to surrender.”

  6. johndarnielle:

as recently as last year this dude was joining people in marches in the hopes of helping in some small way to create a space for more justice in the world
that’s what he spent his life doing
you made good use of your time in the sun Pete Seeger and the work you did will live on in others and in the others who come after them. rest well in the warm earth and may your heirs be worthy of their charge

    johndarnielle:

    as recently as last year this dude was joining people in marches in the hopes of helping in some small way to create a space for more justice in the world

    that’s what he spent his life doing

    you made good use of your time in the sun Pete Seeger and the work you did will live on in others and in the others who come after them. rest well in the warm earth and may your heirs be worthy of their charge

    (Source: itsblackpixelworld)

  7. wwnorton:

    Norton is sad to learn of the death of legendary folk singer Pete Seeger. In addition to his storied career in music, he published two books with us at Norton: Everybody Says Freedom and Where Have All THe Flowers Gone. He will be missed.

  8. theatlantic:

Pete Seeger and the American Soul

The folk singer, who has died at 94, had one defining feature: selflessness.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

    theatlantic:

    Pete Seeger and the American Soul

    The folk singer, who has died at 94, had one defining feature: selflessness.

    Read more. [Image: Reuters]

  9. bostonreview:

RIP Pete Seeger, who “gave American folk music a purism in no way essential to it.” It was a complex and beautiful dream. http://ow.ly/t1QuB

    bostonreview:

    RIP Pete Seeger, who “gave American folk music a purism in no way essential to it.” It was a complex and beautiful dream. http://ow.ly/t1QuB

  10. babylonfalling:


Pete Seeger by Annie Leibovitz

    babylonfalling:

    Pete Seeger by Annie Leibovitz

  11. thenewrepublic:

Pete Seeger died today at the age of 94.
Paul Berman remembers his magnificent, if at times messy, legacy. 

    thenewrepublic:

    Pete Seeger died today at the age of 94.

    Paul Berman remembers his magnificent, if at times messy, legacy. 

  12. newyorker:

Read Alec Wilkinson’s profile of the legendary folk singer Pete Seeger, who died Monday night at the age of 94: http://nyr.kr/1k1xKWJ
Photograph by Annie Leibovitz.

    newyorker:

    Read Alec Wilkinson’s profile of the legendary folk singer Pete Seeger, who died Monday night at the age of 94: http://nyr.kr/1k1xKWJ

    Photograph by Annie Leibovitz.

  13. In order to break even on the cost of roads and pay for every driver who uses them each year, we would need 54% of commuters using a bicycle as their sole means of transportation.

    — Elly Blue, “Car-Free Cyclists Give Back to the Road.” (via utnereader)

  14. newyorker:

Alec Wilkinson remembers Pete Seeger: http://nyr.kr/LkJ83X

“His life was exemplary. The courage he showed in facing down the House Un-American Activities Committee, his refusal to give names, and his insistence on his right to entertain his own conscience are not common behaviors. Plenty of people gave names. Plenty of people pleaded the Fifth Amendment, but Seeger refused to, because the plea implied a person had something to hide. He chose jail rather than collaborate.”

Photograph by CBS/Getty.

    newyorker:

    Alec Wilkinson remembers Pete Seeger: http://nyr.kr/LkJ83X

    “His life was exemplary. The courage he showed in facing down the House Un-American Activities Committee, his refusal to give names, and his insistence on his right to entertain his own conscience are not common behaviors. Plenty of people gave names. Plenty of people pleaded the Fifth Amendment, but Seeger refused to, because the plea implied a person had something to hide. He chose jail rather than collaborate.”

    Photograph by CBS/Getty.

  15. theatlantic:

Rainbow Quest: Pete Seeger’s Strange, Magical 1960s Show

“What’s good about folk music,” wrote Pete Seeger in a 1974 issue of Sing Out! magazine, “is that it is not show business. … It should be the fiddle or guitar, bongo drum or harmonica that’s brought out after supper dishes are cleared away and families make their own music, rather than switching on the magic screen.”
But for a brief period in the mid-1960s, Seeger hosted his own program on the “magic screen.” The show was called Rainbow Quest (named after a line in one of Seeger’s songs). Despite the colorful title, it was filmed in black and white, in a New Jersey studio with no audience, and broadcast over a Spanish-language UHF station. Seeger’s wife, Toshi, was listed in the credits as “Chief Cook and Bottle Washer.”
Even with this bare-bones production, Seeger clearly found the new medium disorienting. “You know, I’m like a blind man, looking out through this little magic screen,” he said at the start of the first episode, gazing awkwardly into the camera. “And I—I don’t know if you see me. I know I can’t see you.” Over the next 10 minutes, he alternated between noodling gorgeously on his banjo and explaining his distrust of the “little box” that sat in every American living room, killing ambition, romance, and human interaction.
Read more.

    theatlantic:

    Rainbow Quest: Pete Seeger’s Strange, Magical 1960s Show

    “What’s good about folk music,” wrote Pete Seeger in a 1974 issue of Sing Out! magazine, “is that it is not show business. … It should be the fiddle or guitar, bongo drum or harmonica that’s brought out after supper dishes are cleared away and families make their own music, rather than switching on the magic screen.”

    But for a brief period in the mid-1960s, Seeger hosted his own program on the “magic screen.” The show was called Rainbow Quest (named after a line in one of Seeger’s songs). Despite the colorful title, it was filmed in black and white, in a New Jersey studio with no audience, and broadcast over a Spanish-language UHF station. Seeger’s wife, Toshi, was listed in the credits as “Chief Cook and Bottle Washer.”

    Even with this bare-bones production, Seeger clearly found the new medium disorienting. “You know, I’m like a blind man, looking out through this little magic screen,” he said at the start of the first episode, gazing awkwardly into the camera. “And I—I don’t know if you see me. I know I can’t see you.” Over the next 10 minutes, he alternated between noodling gorgeously on his banjo and explaining his distrust of the “little box” that sat in every American living room, killing ambition, romance, and human interaction.

    Read more.